Deadmeat

Movie Formats and what they mean (Cam, Screener etc)

4 posts in this topic

CAM - A CAM (or CAMrip) is a theater rip usually made using a digital video camera. Sometimes they use a mini tripod, but usually it is not possible that’s why the camera shakes.
Also seating placement isn't always ideal, and it might be filmed at a certain angle to the screen. If cropped properly, this is hard to tell unless there's text on the screen, but a lot of times these are left with triangular borders on the top and bottom of the screen. Sound is taken from the onboard microphone of the camera, and especially in comedies, laughter can often be heard during the film. Due to these factors picture and sound quality are usually quite poor, but sometimes the theater might be fairly empty and a fairly clear signal will be heard.

TELESYNC (TS) - A telesync is the same spec as a CAM except it uses an external audio source (most likely an audio jack in the chair for hard of hearing people). A direct audio source does not ensure a good quality audio source, as a lot of background noise can interfere. A lot of the times a telesync is filmed in an empty cinema or from the projection booth with a professional camera, giving a better picture quality. Quality ranges drastically, check the sample before downloading the full release. A high percentage of Telesyncs are CAMs that have been mislabeled.

TELECINE (TC) - A telecine machine copies the film digitally from the reels. Sound and picture should be very good, but due to the equipment involved and its price telecines are fairly uncommon. Generally the film will be in correct aspect ratio, although 4:3 telecines have existed. TC should not be confused with TimeCode , which is a visible counter on screen throughout the film.

SCREENER (SCR) - A pre VHS tape, sent to rental stores, and various other places for promotional use. A screener is supplied on a VHS tape, and is usually in a 4:3 aspect ratio, although letterboxed screeners are sometimes found. The main draw back is a "ticker" (a message that scrolls past at the bottom of the screen, with the copyright and anti-copy telephone number). Also, if the tape contains any serial numbers, or any other markings that could lead to the source of the tape, these will have to be blocked, usually with a black mark over the section. This is sometimes only for a few seconds, but unfortunately on some copies this will last for the entire film, and some can be quite big. Depending on the equipment used, screener quality can range from excellent if done from a master copy, to very poor if done on an old VHS recorder through poor capture equipment on a copied tape. Most screeners are transferred to VCD, but a few attempts at SVCD have occurred, some looking better than others.

DVD-SCREENER (DVDscr) - Same premise as a screener, but transferred off a DVD. Usually letterbox, but without the extras that a DVD retail would contain. The ticker is not usually in the black bars, and will disrupt the viewing. If the ripper has any skill, a DVDscr should be very good. Usually transferred to SVCD or DivX/XviD.
 

HDRIP - Taken from HDTV sources, it can be resized down to dvd resolution or it can be 1080i or 720p or higher

 

VODRIP - VODRip stands for Video-On-Demand Rip. This can be done by recording or capturing a video/movie from an On-Demand service such as through a cable or satellite TV service. Most services will state that ripping or capturing films is a breach of their use policy, but it is becoming more and more popular as it requires little technology or setup. There are many online On-Demand services that would not require one to connect their TV and computer. It can be done by using software to identify the video source address and downloading it as a video file which is often the method that bears the best quality end result. However, some people have used screen cams which effectively record, like a video camera, what is on a certain part of the computer screen, but does so internally, making the quality not of HD quality, but nevertheless significantly better than a Cam or Telesync version filmed from a cinema, TV or computer screen.

 

WEB-DL - This is a movie or TV show downloaded via an online distribution website, such as iTunes. The quality is quite good since they are not re-encoded. The video (H.264) and audio (AC3/AAC) streams are usually extracted from the iTunes file and then remuxed into a MKV container without sacrificing quality.

 

WEBRIP - This is a file ripped from a DRM-free streaming service, such as Hulu, CrunchyRoll or WWE Network. The quality is comparable to WEB-DL, but bitrates are lower to save on streaming bandwidth. The file will be extracted from the RTMP protocol and losslessly remuxed from a MP4 or FLV container to MKV.

DVDRip - A copy of the final released DVD. If possible this is released pre retail. Should be excellent quality. DVDrips are released in SVCD and DivX/XviD.

Blu-Ray Disc Rip (BDRip) – Not a full size Blu-Ray rip but the Source used to create is the Original Blu-Ray Disc

VHSRip - Transferred off a retail VHS, mainly skating/sports videos and adult releases.

TVRip - TV episode that is either from Network (capped using digital cable/satellite boxes are preferable) or pre-air from satellite feeds sending the program around to networks a few days earlier. Some programs contain extra parts and the "dark matches" and camera/commentary tests are included on the rips. VCD/SVCD/DivX/XviD rips are all supported by the TV scene.

WORKPRINT (WP) - A workprint is a copy of the film that has not been finished. It can be missing scenes, music, and quality can range from excellent to very poor. Some WPs are very different from the final print and others can contain extra scenes. WPs can be nice additions to the collection once a good quality final has been obtained.

DivX Re-Enc - A DivX re-enc is a film that has been taken from its original VCD source, and re-encoded into a small DivX file. These aren't really worth downloading, unless you're that unsure about a film you only want a 200MB copy of it. Generally you should avoid it.

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